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May 16, 2014

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Ben

The flag is in St. Paul, at the History Center, but not currently on display. It has been publicly shown as part of a larger civil war exhibit.

More prominently, we display the battle flags of Minnesota regiments at the state capitol rotunda. http://collections.mnhs.org/battleflags/index.php/10001446

Barry

"I want to think about why we seem to not be bothered by the presence of a flag in one place while it's a real flashpoint in other places, such as on the sidewalk next to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. "


Would you also not understand the difference between a captured Nazi flag in a museum and a Nazi flag flow by neo-Nazis outside that museum?

Alfred L. Brophy

Ben-- thanks for filling in the story! This is good to know.

Barry, thanks for commenting.

I do understand the difference. The sentences that follow what you quoted explain some of the differences. You may also have seen that I link to some of my previous blogging about captured ordnance. Moreover, I listed a hierarchy of places and ways that Confederate flags are displayed, which reflect the different uses of the flag.

I thought about using an example very similar to what you describe -- I was in a county historical museum recently that had a building devoted to the first and second World Wars, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Most of the display was of uniforms and weapons, but they also displayed a huge Nazi banner. It had been captured and brought back to North Carolina by a soldier from that county. Even in that setting, where it was part of memorializing our country's struggle and that county's contributions to the defeat of Nazism, it was disquieting to me. Not that I'd suggest taking it down.

Former Editor

The New York State Military Museum has quite a few confederate flags as part of its collection. I'm not aware of it ever displaying any of them outside of a "history of the civil war" type context.

Barry

"Barry, thanks for commenting.

I do understand the difference. The sentences that follow what you quoted explain some of the differences. You may also have seen that I link to some of my previous blogging about captured ordnance. Moreover, I listed a hierarchy of places and ways that Confederate flags are displayed, which reflect the different uses of the flag."

Then why did you write the article?
What does this sentence mean?

"I want to think about why we seem to not be bothered by the presence of a flag in one place while it's a real flashpoint in other places, such as on the sidewalk next to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. "

Alfred L. Brophy

Barry,

I don't think you read my post or the comment that I had responding to your comment, or you would have known why I was writing this. I'm writing about the importance of context and the uses that people make of flags. My initial post asked a question and then in the sentences that followed it went on begin to answer the question.

Your failure to read my post and the comment afterwards, which is a response to you, illustrates why conversations on this topic are so difficult. For you and all too many people the issue is clear and there's no need for a discussion. Unfortunately, the "clear" answer people arrive at without discussion is not so clear to people on the other side.

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