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December 22, 2015

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Anon

Is there a reason for the omissions you noted?

john

Hi Anon,

The excel sheet is a work in progress, and just received from comments from colleagues on these omissions over last day. It will be reworked in, but thought could just give specific examples of types of things where had omissions and might be additional ones. But will be amending with these and other revisions as review/develop.

Warm regards,
john

[M][a][c][K]

Antitrust law outside the US is typically called "competition law" and many antitrust practitioners need to understand basic EU competition law.

[M][@][c][K]

My earlier post was short because of limited time.

What I was going to point out is that there are certain areas of law - and hence legal education - that often have international aspects. Indeed, I'd say that international issues intrude often enough that pretty well every practitioner will run into them and that they should therefore be covered to at least a limited degree in a course in these subjects. Area where you see regularly see international issues (a limited list) are:

Antitrust law (and its synonym Competition Law)
Data Law (because of the EU data directive and equivalents)
Intellectual Property Law (most applicants for patents seek them internationally, copyright are internationally created under Berne)
Family Law (it can come up in custody cases)
Corporate Taxation
Admiralty
Telecoms law

Sy Ablelman

I don't see ETHICS on that list! You professors and deans are doing a terrible job teaching these newbie desperate, struggling, frazzled, brainless no business being Solos, ETHICS. Look at any list of bar suspensions and on line complaints from any jurisdiction and you will see kids stealing paltry sums from their clients. They are blowing 200K for a couple thousand in Earnest money deposit theft and not paying their clients PI settlements. Or stealing their bond slip money. Shameful. You guys should have weeded them out. Instead, you took their tuition money.

[M][@][c][K]

Sy, I'm neither a professor nor a dean.

So please, stop preaching at me.

Sy Ablelman

Brackets, thank god you are neither a professor nor a dean. There is hope for humanity. Maybe not if Trump gets the nomination. Anyway, I am relieved....I enjoy you banter with Anon. Got to admit, these professors and deans did not say anything about Ethics in the original post.

[M][a][c][K]

Sh,

Legal ethics rules are decidedly non-international. Perhaps no area of legal education involves international aspects less than the ethics rules - and I'm admitted in multiple countries - I know this....

Sy Ablelman

Brackets,

Ethics are Universal. Just ask all these professors on this blog that taught us about Aristotle and Locke. Stealing is stealing, client funds are client funds whether you are in Illinois (mile after magnificent mile) or the Democratic Republic of Madagascar. Let me ask this: What would happen to a newbie solo lawyer if he took his client's bond money in Indonesia? A one suspension and restitution? Didn't think so.

john

Hi Mack,

Good point; agreed.

The 'international' pops up regularly, and there is a certain interdisciplinarity to it, that I think is part of what is being captured with words like 'transnational' and 'global' for classes/journals/centers.

The study here is more narrow, but if you have any suggestions of a course(s) you'd like to see a mapping of and if any particular reasons/trends, would be keen to make sure to have it in the mix (haskell@mc.edu). Right now, working on two news studies, one for veteran oriented clinics and one concerning lawyers teaching administrative law.

Warm regards over the holidays.
john

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