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August 17, 2012

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Steve Diamond

What the market giveth the market taketh away. Can we all stop blaming law schools for the imbalance of supply and demand now?

Alfred Brophy

I'm surprised that there isn't more talk about the low cost options that already exist. Why isn't there more focus on the schools such as North Carolina Central, whose tuition and fees are about $11,000/year for in-state students.

Tamara Piety

Hear hear Steve. Talk about mistaking cause and effect.

Stacey

Oh yeah Steve, why would we blame the law schools? Oh yeah, the fraud...

anon

Is there not an obvious bubble created by the transfer of fed money to law schools using the students as pawns?
And, are not the law schools using the award of tuition waivers as a means to effect social values? (Compare, free care in emergency rooms, skyrocketing costs to paying customers.)

Ask for Law Schools Online

A lot of oversimplification in the article. One of the biggest reasons for tuition increases at law schools at public universities is that the amount of state funding. or the lack of it. State law school I went to in the late 1980's state covered 75% of law schools costs, tuition, about 25%. Now the law school gets no funding from the state. This translates into a 300% increase in tuition, even if the school had kept its operating costs fixed for the last 25 years.

The article makes no comparison of tuition increases in law schools versus other advanced degree programs. Is it higher or lower than for other programs.

Also the article does not compare employment rates now versus in the past. Back when I graduated a significant portion of graduates did not go into law, about 20% went into other professions, most of which utilized the legal training but were not "lawyers".

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